September 2007: Vol.5 No.4
  EP Update   |   In the Scene   |    Resources   |   Call for Papers, Partners & Proposals   |   Upcoming Events


Dear Ecoagriculture Partners,

We are pleased to announce that on August 25th, the Ecoagriculture Partners initiative celebrated its 5th Birthday! Ecoagriculture Partners began as an idea to bridge the sustainable agriculture and biodiversity conservation communities at the Implementation Conference of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD). With a lot of excitement about establishing partnerships, a very diverse group of nearly 50 people showed up for the first planning workshop in Johannesburg, South Africa. By the end of the workshop, they had resolved to form a multi-stakeholder coalition to raise the profile of ‘ecoagriculture’, to mobilize both resources and political will for ecoagriculture, and to support one another’s initiatives. Plans gelled at the international multi-stakeholder planning workshop, held the following February. As they say, ‘the rest is history.’

We are so happy to see that the seeds of that first encounter have blossomed into many individual and institutional partnerships, including our own organization. On the eve of our 6th year, we reflect back on our original intentions and lessons learned since Johannesburg. The need for partnerships and knowledge-sharing remains as pertinent today as it was then. Five years later, however, we have a much deeper understanding of the imperative to invest in long-term relationships and trust building with partners, supporting them to enable institutional change. While many of the original groups from Johannesburg are still among our board, key partners and staff, our network has grown to reach more than 2,500 stakeholders worldwide working for the development of ecoagriculture! Thanks to each one of you for being a part of our multidisciplinary, international community. Over the next five years, let's work together to achieve ecoagriculture outcomes in landscapes around the world.


Warm regards,

Sara J. Scherr, President
Ecoagriculture Partners

Table of Contents

ECOAGRICULTURE PARTNERS UPDATE:

  1. New book: Farming with Nature: The Science and Practice of Ecoagriculture -- to be released this week
  2. Model Forest Network and Ecoagriculture Partners measure landscapes in Latin America
  3. New book: Evaluation and Conservation of Biodiversity in the Fragmented Countries of Mesoamerica [Evaluación y Conservación de Biodiversidad en Paisajes Fragmentados de Mezo América] – to be released late September
  4. Ecoagriculture Partners welcomes new Program Directors for Policy and Markets
  5. Ecoagriculture Board of Directors meets in Kenya
  6. Session on ecoagriculture organized at the Ecological Society of America conference, California, USA
  7. Uganda Ecoagriculture Working Group hosts workshop in Kampala, August 2007

IN THE SCENE:

  1. TerrAfrica to host side event at upcoming COP of the UN Convention to Combat Desertification
  2. International Finance Corporation (IFC) to launch initiative to protect biodiversity in agricultural commodities production
  3. Community leaders review opportunities and challenges for forest enterprise development in tropical countries
  4. Gloria Jean’s Coffees of Australia increases commitment to Rainforest Alliance Certified Coffee
  5. Workshop evaluates improved soil conditions needed to sustain agricultural growth under rising population pressure in a changing climate
  6. EDUN Clothing Company joins forces with the Wildlife Conservation Society to launch the Conservation Cotton Initiative

RESOURCES:

  1. New book: A Guide for Desert and Dryland Restoration
  2. Online Forum: Group on Science and Innovation Policy (GOSIP)
  3. Publication: Developing Markets for Agrobiodiversity - Securing Livelihoods in Dryland Areas
  4. Scoping study: Poverty Reduction Potential of Compensation for Ecosystem Services
  5. CAPRi Working Paper: Beyond Group Ranch Subdivision: Collective Action for Livestock Mobility, Ecological Viability, and Livelihoods
  6. Paper: Preparing for a Changing Environment Using Scenarios for Environmental Education
  7. New Book: The Earth Only Endures - On Reconnecting with Nature and Our Place In It
  8. Article from Overseas Development Institute (ODI): Biofuels, Agriculture and Poverty Reduction
  9. Article in Agricultural Systems: Multifunctionality of Integrated Farming Systems in Northeast Thailand
  10. Report from the Wildlife Enterprise Network on how to link biodiversity conservation to economic benefits for human communities
  11. The Hub: Online network for West and Central Africa promoting rural development and food security issues

CALL FOR PAPERS, PARTNERS, AND PROPOSALS:

  1. Call for Proposals: Global Development Network Awards
  2. Call for Applicants: LIFE and Nature, LIFE and Biodiversity in the European Union
  3. Call for Applicants: Fullbright Scholar Awards in Agriculture
  4. Call for Abstracts: Including Land Use and Land Cover Change in Earth System Models, San Francisco, USA, December 14, 2007
  5. Call for Proposals: Ecological Opportunities Fund
  6. Call for Proposals: Building Capacity for Ecology Fund seeks to develop networks

UPCOMING EVENTS:

  1. Population, Health, and Environment Conference: Integrated Development for East Africa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, November 14-16, 2007
  2. Conference: Food Security and Environmental Change: Linking Science, Development and Policy for Adaptation, Oxford, UK, April 2-4, 2008
  3. Audubon California Assembly, Pacific Grove, California, USA, October 7-9, 2007
  4. Permaculture Courses: Southern France, September 17-30, and San Luis Obispo County, California, USA, October 2007 – March 2008
  5. Leadership Course for Ecoagriculture: Integrated Development of Rural Territories in Central America [Liderazgo para el Desarollo de la Ecoagricultura: Gestion Integrada de Territorios Rurales en Centroamerica], Costa Rica, November 8-17, 2007
  6. Summer Course: Restoration Ecology of Low-Productive Ecosystems, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, September 23-27, 2007

Events announced in previous newsletters can be found on our website at http://www.ecoagriculturepartners.org/events/other.htm

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Ecoagriculture Partners' Updates
  1. New book: Farming with Nature: The Science and Practice of Ecoagriculture -- to be released this week

    Ecoagriculture Partners and the World Conservation Union (IUCN) are proud to announce the launch of a new book, published by Island Press and edited by Sara J. Scherr of Ecoagriculture Partners and Jeffrey A. McNeely of IUCN. Co-authored by 61 authors from 45 different institutions, the book is a unique collaboration among renowned agricultural and ecological scientists, conservationists, and farm and community leaders to synthesize knowledge and experience across sectors.

    Organized into 4 main sections with 22 chapters, the book moves from a review of agricultural production systems that benefit both farmers and biodiversity to a wider analyses of biodiversity and ecosystem management in ecoagriculture landscapes, concluding with an overview of the of institutional foundations needed for ecoagriculture, as well as some policy recommendations. Insights are drawn from around the world, in tropical, Mediterranean and temperate environments, from farming systems that range from highly commercialized to semi-subsistence. Farming with Nature can serve as a foundation document for planners, farm organizations, researchers, project developers and policy makers to develop strategies for promoting and sustaining ecoagriculture landscapes.

    To order a copy of the book, visit


  2. Model Forest Network and Ecoagriculture Partners measure landscapes in Latin America

    Within Latin America, the Model Forest Network (MFN) and Ecoagriculture Partners (EP) are among a number of organizations and initiatives seeking to support local stakeholders to develop collaborative approaches to managing their landscapes. The “model forest” concept focuses on enabling locally-based organizations and individuals to collectively promote sustainable forest management in large forested landscapes. Within Latin America alone, there are now 14 Model Forests, located in Costa Rica, Mexico, Brazil, Bolivia, Honduras, Argentina, Chile and the Dominican Republic.

    As well as facilitating knowledge sharing between local actors within and between landscapes, a common goal of both the Model Forest Network and Ecoagriculture Partners is to support the development of participatory landscape monitoring and evaluation processes for common conservation, production and rural development goals. This is the focus of EP’s Landscape Measures Initiative and the Latin American and Caribbean Model Forest Network's Principles, Criteria and Indicators project. Joint MFN-EP research was recently initiated in a number of landscapes in Guatemala, Costa Rica, Chile and Colombia.

    For further details on The Model Forest Network, see: www.bosquesmodelo.net.

    For further details on EP's Landscape Measures Initiative see: http://www.ecoagriculturepartners.org/programs/programs.php.


  3. New book: Evaluation and Conservation of Biodiversity in the Fragmented Countries of Mesoamerica [Evaluación y Conservación de Biodiversidad en Paisajes Fragmentados de Mezo América] – to be released late September

    This book, edited by Celia Harvey of Conservation International and Joel Saenz of Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, and co-published by Ecoagriculture Partners, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and Conservation International, will be released in late September. Written by more than 50 authors, the book is organized into 5 main sections. It explores the role of fragmented and agricultural landscapes in conserving biodiversity in Mesoamerica and provides a state-of-the-art overview of what is known about plant and animal diversity within the human-modified landscapes that increasingly dominate the region. It also highlights innovative ways in which agricultural landscapes can be designed and managed for conservation outcomes and provides clear policy recommendations for decision-makers.

    Written in Spanish, the book is intended to serve as a key resource for professionals interested in achieving biodiversity conservation within human-modified landscapes of Latin America. The book will be available at a subsidized cost of $15 (+ shipping) in several locations in Central America (CATIE, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Conservation International Offices, among others) and the US.

    To order copies, please contact Celia Harvey at c.harvey@conservation.org.


  4. Ecoagriculture Partners welcomes new Program Directors for Policy and Markets

    Ecoagriculture Partners is pleased to welcome to our staff , as of October 1, Dr. Cosmas Milton Obote Ochieng as Director of our Policy program and Dr. Thomas Oberthür as Director of our Markets for Ecoagriculture Products and Services program.

    Cosmos has been working as a Research Fellow in Organization and Management of African Agricultural Innovation Systems with the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), and was instrumental in helping start NEPAD (New Partnership for Africa’s Development). He has worked extensively with national governments, donors, the private sector and civil society organizations, and has consulted on issues of trade, investment, aid and agricultural issues. He received his Ph.D. in Development Studies from Oxford University, his MPhil in Development Studies from Cambridge University and a First Class Honours Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, History and Literature from Kenyatta University, Kenya. Cosmos will be based in Kenya.

    Thomas most recently was Project Manager and Senior Scientist at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) in Colombia. He has experience in research and consulting on soil management in farming systems of Europe and Asia and the development of leadership in multi-disciplinary and multi-partner projects that integrate agronomy and agribusiness in Latin America, Asia and Africa. He received his Project Management Certification from the Crawford Masters Class in Management, his Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Western Austria, and his M.Sc. in Agronomy and Soil Science from Leipzig University and the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines. Thomas will be based in Colombia.


  5. Ecoagriculture Board of Directors meets in Kenya

    Ecoagriculture Partners held our most recent Board Meeting in Nairobi and Naivasha, Kenya, from July 18-20, 2007. Highlights included an enjoyable and well-attended Reception in Nairobi with current and prospective partners, and a fascinating all-day field trip to visit the Kijabe ecoagriculture initiative hosted by the Kenya Environmental Volunteers (KENVO). The Board approved the extension of the current Strategic Plan through 2009, as well as Ecoagriculture Partners' support for and documentation of multi-stakeholder ecoagriculture development in East Africa and Mesoamerica as a key priority.


  6. Session on ecoagriculture organized at the Ecological Society of America conference, California, USA

    Ecoagriculture Partners and CATIE co-organized a session at the Ecological Society of America (ESA) conference on August 7th, moderated by Fabrice DeClerk of CATIE and titled “Ecoagriculture: restoring wild biodiversity, livelihoods, and ecosystem processes in agricultural landscapes.” Featuring 8 presentations, some by authors of the upcoming “Farming with Nature” book, the speakers focused on ecology’s contribution to landscape management of agroecosysems. They presented a framework for measuring landscape performance within agroecosystems, offered case studies and discussed challenges and opportunities that arise from using the ecoagriculture framework.

    More information on the meeting can be found at www.esa.org/sanjose.


  7. Uganda Ecoagriculture Working Group hosts workshop in Kampala, August 2007

    In early August the Uganda Ecoagriculture Working Group (UAWG) hosted a half-day workshop in Kampala that brought together the leaders of ecoagriculture project initiatives in Uganda with leaders of Ecoagriculture Partners’ (EP) Community Knowledge Service program and its Landscape Measures program. The project in Uganda grew out of an Ecoagriculture Leadership course that EP and the World Agroforestry Center conducted in 2006. Post-leadership course initiatives have been formed through partnerships of organizations who aim to advance the state of knowledge about ecoagriculture and scale up practice in the field.

    Ugandan based initiatives include an ecoagriculture landscape analysis measuring water quality, socio-economic status, land use/land cover, and biodiversity in Mubuku; an effort to document successful ecoagriculture practices and develop communities of practice in Kabale and Kisoro; an initiative to create awareness of ecoagriculture potential and its market linkages among small-scale farmers and other local stakeholders and expand farmer capacity to practice ecoagriculture in the Kayunga and Kisoro Districts; and the development of the Kapchorwa Landcare Chapter.

    Claire Rhodes of EP and Elspeth Halverson of the UNDP Equator Initiative also discussed farmer to farmer knowledge sharing and support networks utilizing tools such as portals, telecenters, radio programs and cell phones, while Louise Buck, coordinator of EP’s Landscape Measures initiative, highlighted online resources to aid in scoping activities.

    For more information, contact Claire Rhodes at crhodes@ecoagriculture.org, or Louise Buck at leb3@cornell.edu.


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In the Scene
  1. TerrAfrica to host side event at upcoming COP of the UN Convention to Combat Desertification

    TerrAfrica is a partnership that aims to address land degradation by scaling up harmonized support for effective and efficient country-driven Sustainable Land Management (SLM) practices in Sub-Saharan African countries. On Tuesday, September 11, TerrAfrica will hold a side event at the UNCCD COP in Madrid, Spain, to discuss strengthening SLM partnerships, knowledge management tools for SLM, and progress in implementing SLM at country level. Panelists for the event include: representatives of the governments of Ethiopia, Kenya, Mali, and Denmark; the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD); the Global Environment Facility Secretariat (GEF); the Global Mechanism of the UNCCD; the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO); World Bank; and other TerrAfrica partners.

    For more information, see the event flyer here or contact Kristyn Schrader (World Bank external affairs) at kschrader@worldbank.org.


  2. International Finance Corporation (IFC) to launch initiative to protect biodiversity in agricultural commodities production

    IFC and the Global Environment Facility, with other donors and partners, will launch an initiative in the third quarter of 2007 to promote best environmental and social practices in the production and overall supply chain of four commodities: palm oil, cocoa, soybeans and sugarcane.

    The new program, called the Biodiversity and Agricultural Commodities Program, will offer advisory services for projects involving the private sector that support adoption of better management practices at the production level, increase the demand for biodiversity-friendly products, and improve financial institutions' ability to support adoption of biodiversity-friendly practices. The program will also support multistakeholder initiatives that create sustainable markets for agricultural commodities. Ecoagriculture Partners will support the monitoring and evaluation of this initiative.

    The program management unit will send out requests for project proposals in September/October 2007.

    For more information see: http://www.ifc.org/ifcext/enviro.nsf/Content/Biodiversity_BACP.


  3. Community leaders review opportunities and challenges for forest enterprise development in tropical countries

    The International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO), Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI), World Conservation Union (IUCN), and Global Alliance of Forest Communities (GACF) sponsored a global conference this July for community leaders to discuss the findings of a global scoping of Community Forest Enteprises (CFEs), hosted by the Government of Acre and Government of Brazil in Rio Branco in Acre State in Brazil. Community leaders, NGOs, ITTO member governments, and international organization staff met for 6 days to discuss the implications of a global scoping of CFEs by ITTO, RRI, and Forest Trends. Community leaders from the 20 case studies and other community leaders, particularly from Brazil and Bolivia, attended the event from 42 countries, opened by the Acre governor and the Brazil Minister of Environment, Marina Silva. Lessons, key barriers and constraints, and recommendations were discussed in a series of break-out group discussions carried out in multiple languages (French, English, Spanish, and Portuguese).

    For more information see: www.rightsandresources.org/news/events/CFE_conference.html.


  4. Gloria Jean’s Coffees of Australia increases commitment to Rainforest Alliance Certified Coffee

    Australian-owned Gloria Jean’s Coffees, one of the world’s fastest growing specialty coffee retailers, announced in early August that it will significantly increase the amount of coffee it purchases from Rainforest Alliance Certified farms to nearly 3.9 million pounds (1,750 metric tons) this year. The increase in beans purchased by the company translates into tremendous benefits for farming communities in Latin America, where the coffee is produced.

    Farms earn Rainforest Alliance certification by meeting a holistic set of environmental, social and economic standards that are focused on sustainable farm management and include ecosystem conservation, wildlife protection, dignified working and living conditions, healthcare and education for farm children, among other things.

    For more information contact Gretchen Ruethling at the Rainforest Alliance: gruethling@ra.org.


  5. Workshop evaluates improved soil conditions needed to sustain agricultural growth under rising population pressure in a changing climate

    This workshop, held at the University of Newcastle, UK, in March and organized by the Tropical Agriculture Association and partners, focused on the agro-ecological and socio-economic aspects of landscape management as a means to sustain ecological services that support people’s livelihoods. Key factors determining sustainability were identified as (1) biological activity in the soil which, with adequate and ongoing provision of organic materials, is capable of maintaining its porosity on a recurring basis; and (2) decision-making by farm-families, which determines their ability to manage of the land they rely on for their livelihoods.

    As a follow up to the workshop, participants proposed an interactive meeting of farmers and their representatives, governments, policy-makers, international aid agencies, private-sector entities, researchers, extension agencies, civil society organizations and others. The meeting will be hosted by the World Agroforestry Centre and held in Nairobi, Kenya, in 2008.

    For more information contact Amir Kassam at kassamamir@aol.com.


  6. EDUN Clothing Company joins forces with the Wildlife Conservation Society to launch the Conservation Cotton Initiative

    The Conservation Cotton Initiative (CCI) will work towards improving the livelihoods of communities in Africa by promoting greater investment in sustainable and ethical production of conservation-friendly agricultural products. CCI will focus in particular on cotton grown organically or through methods that are part of a transition from conventional to organic production. Another focus of CCI is to incorporate sustainable agricultural practices and the protection of wildlife. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) currently works on sustainable farming with farmers in Madagascar, Uganda and Zambia. WCS will advise and work with EDUN in those countries to help farmers apply sustainable methods in growing cotton.

    For more information, contact Bridget Russo of EDUN at bridget@edun.ie or Stephen Sautner of the Wildlife Conservation Society at ssautner@wcs.org.


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Resources

  1. New book: A Guide for Desert and Dryland Restoration

    Dryland degradation and desertification now affect almost a billion people around the world. Tragically, the biological resources and productivity of millions of acres of land are lost to desertification each year because people remain unaware of strategies and techniques that could improve yields, reduce risk, and begin healing the world’s deserts. A Guide for Desert and Dryland Restoration, by David A. Bainbridge, is the first book to offer practical, field-tested solutions to this critical problem.

    The book discusses the ecology of desert plants, explores the causes of desertification and land abuse, and outlines the processes and procedures needed to evaluate, plan, implement and monitor desert restoration projects. Each chapter represents a guide to a critical topic for environmental restoration; extensive photographs, diagrams, and drawings give detailed information for immediate application, and additional resources are included in appendixes.

    A Guide for Desert and Dryland Restoration is the first comprehensive book focused on restoring arid regions, and clearly demonstrates that arid lands can be successfully rehabilitated. In addition to restorationists, the book will be an invaluable resource for anyone working in arid lands, including farmers, ranchers, gardeners, landscapers, outdoor recreation professionals and activists.

    For more information, please visit: http://www.desertrestore.org/main.asp.


  2. Online Forum: Group on Science and Innovation Policy (GOSIP)

    GOSIP is a moderated forum for sharing information on important developments on science and innovation policy worldwide. The information shared includes news items, books, reports, research papers, websites and updates on the activities members. The list welcomes comments and contributions on contemporary policy issue but encourages members to conduct networking, extended discussions and blogging offline.

    GOSIP website: tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/InnovationPolicy/.

    To subscribe send an e-mail to: InnovationPolicy-subscribe@yahoogroups.com.


  3. Publication: Developing Markets for Agrobiodiversity - Securing Livelihoods in Dryland Areas

    In this publication by Alessandra Guiliani, pproduced by Bioversity International and published by Earth Scan, Giuliani gives a practical account of a Bioversity study of how communities are developing markets for local products derived from neglected and underutilized plants. The publication highlights how biodiversity can make a contribution to livelihood security in communities that inhabit difficult environments with unique resources.

    For more information and to order click here: www.shop.earthscan.co.uk/ProductDetails/mcs/productID/794/.


  4. Scoping study: Poverty Reduction Potential of Compensation for Ecosystem Services

    The Pan-Tropical Scoping Study of Compensation for Ecosystem Services was conducted by a consortium of organizations led by the World Agroforestry Center, including the African Centre for Technology Studies (ACTS), Corporación Grupo Randi Randi (CGRR), Forest Trends (with Ecoagriculture Partners and the Rights and Resources Initiative), Institute for Social and Economic Change (ISEC), The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and The World Conservation Union (IUCN) during 2006 and 2007. The study discussed the potential of Payments for Ecosystem Services to alleviate poverty. The framing document reviews the evolution and fundamentals of PES (or Compensation and Rewards for Environmental Services, as designated by the study). The study was commissioned by the Rural Poverty and Environment Program of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) to provide an overview of relevant developments in Africa, Asia and Latin America.
    The scoping study produced a series of multi-authored issue papers that are downloadable for free on-line:

    Compensation and Rewards for Ecosystem Services (CRES) in the Developing World: Framing Pan-Tropical Analysis and Comparison. www.worldagroforestry.org/downloads/publications/PDFs/WP14963.PDF.

    Exploring the inter-linkages among and between Compensation and Rewards for Ecosystem Services (CRES) and human well-being. www.worldagroforestry.org/downloads/publications/PDFs/WP14956.PDF.

    Criteria and indicators for ES compensation and reward mechanisms: realistic, voluntary, conditional and pro-poor. www.worldagroforestry.org/downloads/publications/PDFs/WP14964.pdf.

    The conditions for effective mechanisms of CRES. www.worldagroforestry.org/downloads/publications/PDFs/WP14958.PDF.

    Organization and governance for fostering pro-poor CRES
    www.rightsandresources.org/library/publications/global/WP39.pdf.

    How important will different types of compensation and reward mechanisms be in shaping poverty and ecosystem services across Africa, Asia & Latin America over the next two decades? www.worldagroforestry.org/downloads/publications/PDFs/WP14960.PDF.


  5. CAPRi Working Paper: Beyond Group Ranch Subdivision: Collective Action for Livestock Mobility, Ecological Viability, and Livelihoods

    This paper by Shauna BurnSilver and Esther Mwangi, part of the Collective Action and Property Rights (CAPRi) working paper series, leverages datasets and results from two separate studies carried out across eight Kajiado group ranches. It offers a unique look at emergent pre- and post-subdivision trends from an interdisciplinary framework that combines ecological, political and human-ecological research perspectives. It provides insights into the following issues: the loss of flexibility and mobility for Maasai herders’ due to subdivision, the nature of collective activities that individuals pursue after subdivision, and the emergence of pasture sharing arrangements.

    For the full text see www.capri.cgiar.org/wp/capriwp66.asp.


  6. Paper: Preparing for a Changing Environment Using Scenarios for Environmental Education

    This paper, by Sandra J. Velarde, Sheila H. Rao, Kristen Evans, Tom Vandenbosch and Rocio Prieto, was presented in July to the 4th World Environmental Education Congress in Durban, South Africa. It explains how scenarios and visioning are useful tools for environmental education, in particular for changing environments (social and biophysical). The authors outline the scenarios methodology and present lessons learnt from applying scenarios to environmental education with children and youth in Peru. They conclude with an analysis of the benefits and challenges of using scenarios for environmental education to accomplish environmental awareness objectives.

    For more information, contact Sandra Velarde at sandvel@yahoo.com.

    To download the paper, see: www.asb.cgiar.org/pdfwebdocs/Velarde-et-al-2007-Preparing-for-a-changing-environment.pdf.


  7. New Book: The Earth Only Endures - On Reconnecting with Nature and Our Place In It

    This book by Professor Jules Pretty at the Center for the Environment and Society at the University of Essex, published by Earthscan Press, explores the changing relationship of humans to the natural world through a series of interlinked essays organized into sixteen chapters. It explores the human relationship with nature, animals and places. Centering on themes of connections and estrangement, it offers directions for an optimistic future. The book is organized into 5 sections: Green Places, Animals and Us, Food and Land, People and Land, and The Future. Showing how our modern lifestyles and economies would need 6-8 earths to support them if they were adopted by the entire world’s population, Pretty discusses the challenges of climate change and warns against a pending global environmental catastrophe.

    To order the book see: www.earthscan.co.uk.


  8. Article from Overseas Development Institute (ODI): Biofuels, Agriculture and Poverty Reduction

    This article, part of the Natural Resource Perspectives series of ODI, examines biofuels from the perspective of poverty reduction. By Leo Peskett, Rachel Slater, Chris Stevens and Annie Dufey the editorial explores such questions such as: Will biofuels take land from food production? What impacts on food prices are likely? And how might biofuels affect food aid from the USA?

    The authors conclude that although the outlook for biofuels is highly context specific, there are steps countries and governments can take to improve market coordination; strike a balance between large, centralized processing facilities and smaller low-tech units; and ensure enforcement of regulations, standards, and appropriate technologies to improve the contribution of biofuels production to climate change mitigation.

    For the full text, please see www.odi.org.uk/nrp/NRP107.pdf.


  9. Article in Agricultural Systems: Multifunctionality of Integrated Farming Systems in Northeast Thailand

    In this article, published in the Journal of Agricultural Systems, Prasnee Tipraqsa of Chiang Mai University and colleagues studied a small sample of farmers in northeast Thailand. These farmers, while not organic, were working to reduce their external inputs, diversify their production, and rely to a greater extent on natural processes to regenerate soil fertility and manage pests and weeds. The researchers compared them with neighboring farmers who work with the conventional commercial rice cultivation practices of the region.

    Among other conclusions, the authors found that the size of integrated farms as well as their families and workforces were larger than commercial farms, and that the stem density of trees as well as the richness of food species and plants used for social services was higher. Soil organic matter was also significantly higher, and by a small margin, land and labor productivity were significantly better.

    To communicate with the authors and/or to request an electronic copy of the paper, write to prasnee@gmail.com.

    Reference: P. Tiprasqa, E.T. Craswell, A.D. Noble and D. Schmit-Vogt 2007. Resource integration for multiple benefits: multifunctionality of integrated farming systems in northeast Thailand. Agricultural Systems 94: 694-703.


  10. Report from the Wildlife Enterprise Network on how to link biodiversity conservation to economic benefits for human communities

    The Wildlife Enterprise Network is a global community of conservationists, businesses, producers and harvesters dedicated to the development and marketing of products that conserve threatened wildlife while contributing to the economic vitality of rural communities. They have produced a report summarizing their March 2007 summit. The report explores the need for increased socially responsible products and how consumers can be motivated to purchase products that protect wildlife and promote biodiversity conservation.

    For the full report see: http://www.wildlifeenterprisenetwork.org/Summit_report.pdf.


  11. The Hub: Online network for West and Central Africa promoting rural development and food security issues

    The Hub, an online network, was established to create communication channels between inter-governmental organizations, civil society, and other development partners in West and Central Africa. The Hub’s goal is to assist West and Central African stakeholders to promote coherence in rural development programs worldwide. The Hub list relevant information sources, provides a space for sharing development experiences, gives advice through calling upon high level expertise, and promotes dialogue by establishing links between rural sector agents.

    For more information, see: www.hubrural.org. The site is available French and English.


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Call for Papers, Partners, and Proposals
  1. Call for Proposals: Global Development Network Awards

    The Global Development Network (GDN) is now accepting submissions for the Eighth Annual Global Development Awards and Medals Competition 2007. This competition is open only to researchers from developing and transition countries. The Awards and Medals Competition is a competitive funding mechanism established by mutual cooperation between GDN and the Government of Japan. Finalists are invited at GDN’s expense to present proposals at the Ninth Annual Global Development Conference, Brisbane, in January 2008.The five categories are as follows:

    • Fragile States: Addressing Vulnerability
    • Household Exposure to Risk: Effects on Poverty
    • The Rule of Law: Providing Security for Development
    • Women’s Rights, Security and Development: Challenges and Opportunities
    • Natural Resources: Risks and Implications for Sustaining Development

    Submission of online registration form, the full proposal in the application template (available at www.gdnet.org/2007awards) and CV’s of the applicants are due by September 17, 2007.

    For more details on topics and application procedures, see: http://www.gdnet.org/middle.php?oid=1217.


  2. Call for Applicants: LIFE and Nature, LIFE and Biodiversity in the European Union

    LIFE is the EU’s financial instrument supporting environmental and nature conservation projects throughout the EU, as well as in some candidate, acceding and neighboring countries. Since 1992, LIFE has co-financed some 2,750 projects, contributing approximately $2.72 billion to the protection of the environment.

    LIFE+ Nature will co-finance best practice or demonstration projects that contribute to the implementation of the Birds and Habitats Directives. The maximum co-financing rate is 50% but may be 75% for projects focusing on priority species or habitats.

    LIFE+ Biodiversity will co-finance innovative or demonstration projects that contribute to the implementation of the objectives of Commission Communication "Halting the loss of biodiversity by 2010 – and beyond". The maximum co-financing rate will be 50%. The Commission has published draft application guidelines in order to help applicants start to prepare their project proposals in time for the submission deadline (November 30, 2007) of the first call for proposals.

    For more information, go to this site.


  3. Call for Applicants: Fullbright Scholar Awards in Agriculture

    Applications continue to be accepted for Fulbright Scholar awards for lecturing, research or combined lecturing/research awards in agriculture during the 2008-2009 academic year. Faculty in agriculture may apply not only for awards specifically in their field, but also for one of the many “All Discipline” awards open to any field.

    Visit www.cies.org for descriptions of available awards and new eligibility requirements. Awards are closing daily, so please consult the relevant program officer before applying.


  4. Call for Abstracts: Including Land Use and Land Cover Change in Earth System Models, San Francisco, USA, December 14, 2007

    This special session at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) 2007 Fall Meeting is an initiative of the Analysis, Integration and Modeling of the Earth System (AIMES) Young Scholars Network 2007. Land use and land cover change are both driver and target of physical and social components of the earth system. The session is intended to provide a platform both for earth system modelers who account for land use changes in their models, and for land use modelers who work on the continental to regional scale.

    Presenters are invited to submit abstracts for papers that explore the interaction of physical and social constraints and drivers in land use decision making, that account for land use dynamics and feedbacks in global model applications, or that provide historical land use data sets. The deadline for submission of abstracts is September 6, 2007.

    For full submission guidelines, please visit http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm07/?content=search&show=detail&sessid=462
    .
    For questions related to this session contact Elke Verbeeten at e.verbeeten@cgiar.org.


  5. Call for Proposals: Ecological Opportunities Fund

    The Ecological Opportunities Fund of the British Ecological Society (BES) will support applications that promote the science of ecology worldwide and that currently fall outside the remit of existing grant schemes under the BES. Applications will need to significantly contribute to one or more of the following BES strategic aims: to support and/or publish ecological research, to encourage communication and /or collaboration among ecologists, to foster the teaching and/or the learning of ecology, and to influence policy and/or practice. The deadline for applications is the 21st of September.

    For more information and application guidelines, see: http://www.britishecologicalsociety.org/articles/grants/EOF/.


  6. Call for Proposals: Building Capacity for Ecology Fund seeks to develop networks

    In anticipation of its centenary, the British Ecological Society (BES) will be supporting ecologists to establish organizations that can promote the science of ecology in their geographic area. The BES will do this through a new initiative called the Building Capacity for Ecology Fund (BCEF), which has the backing of the International Association of Ecology (Intecol). The Building Capacity for Ecology Fund will assist in the development of networks that will allow ecologists in countries that currently lack a well-developed society or ecology institute to interact and gain from the experience and activities of colleagues. Ultimately, they expect the interactions promoted by the Fund to lead to the creation of new national or regional societies that will affiliate to Intecol. The deadline for new applications is October 15, 2007.

    For an application, guidelines, and a budget template, see http://www.britishecologicalsociety.org/articles/grants/bcef/.

    Please contact the grant officer with any questions at dominic@britishecologicalsociety.org.


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Upcoming Events
  1. Population, Health, and Environment Conference: Integrated Development for East Africa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, November 14-16, 2007

    This regional conference will explore concrete ways to address development priorities such as poverty reduction, improved health and natural resource management through an integrated population-health-environment approach. Join field practitioners, policymakers, researchers, the media, community leaders and advocates from Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and other countries around the world. Participants will engage in discussions, skills-building workshops, a field visit, and networking opportunities.

    For more information, please visit this site.


  2. Conference: Food Security and Environmental Change: Linking Science, Development and Policy for Adaptation, Oxford, UK, April 2-4, 2008

    This conference will bring together the research and policy communities addressing food security, environmental change and food policy to:

    • Present and discuss research on global environmental change, food security and food systems, and decision support dialogues from the broad international community
    • Present and discuss findings from conceptual and regional research supported by the GECAFS project (see www.gecafs.org/)
    • Bring together scientists and policy makers from diverse backgrounds to forge new partnerships

    Call for Papers: Abstracts are invited for oral and poster presentation at the conference and should be submitted online at www.foodsecurity.elsevier.com by October 31, 2007.

    For more information see: www.foodsecurity.elsevier.com.


  3. Audubon California Assembly, Pacific Grove, California, USA, October 7-9, 2007

    The 2007 Assembly will examine the problems of global warming from a wildlife and ecosystem perspective and help us understand how global warming should affect our land management decisions. The Assembly will spotlight climate solutions for conserving energy with simple changes around the home to reduce greenhouse gases nationally by 80%. Participants will have an opportunity to attend a variety of interactive workshops on restoration, policy and education, and will be able to interact with renowned speakers emphasizing the importance of effective conservation of California's birds, wildlife and habitat.

    For more information see: http://ca.audubon.org/audubon_assembly.html.

    For questions, contact Claudia Eyzaguirre at ceyzaguirre@audubon.org.


  4. Permaculture Courses: Southern France, September 17-30, and San Luis Obispo County, California, USA, October 2007 – March 2008

    This permaculture course, run by Earthflow Design Works, provides holistic tools for critical decision-making and problem-solving in land and farm management. The design course is a 12-day, information-packed training program. It is presented in 3 parts as a 2-week course or as a monthly weekend series.

    For more information see http://www.earthflow.com/upcoming_courses.php#.


  5. Leadership Course for Ecoagriculture: Integrated Development of Rural Territories in Central America [Liderazgo para el Desarollo de la Ecoagricultura: Gestion Integrada de Territorios Rurales en Centroamerica], Costa Rica, November 8-17, 2007

    This international course on scaling up ecoagriculture, to be held in Spanish, will deal with the integrated management of rural territories of Central America. The course will develop capacities in: leadership for action and territorial collaboration; multi-sectoral integrated innovation; identification and analysis of landscapes and territories; and design of strategies and integrated management plans of countries, ecosystems and territories. The course is sponsored by the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA, Costa Rica), Ecoagriculture Partners, the Center for Sustainable Resource Development at University of California Berkeley, and the World Conservation Union (IUCN).

    For more information, contact Rebecca Martinez at rebeca.martiniz@iica.int or Jose Carlos Arze jose.carlos.arze@iica.int.


  6. Summer Course: Restoration Ecology of Low-Productive Ecosystems, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, September 23-27, 2007

    Restoration ecology is the science of recovery and management of ecological integrity. This course is primarily intended for PhD students who work in the field of restoration ecology of low productive ecosystems, such as heathlands, species rich grasslands and similar communities. Special emphasis will be put upon the interaction between abiotic constraints and restoration success. The program includes:

    • lectures of specialists during the morning to provide theoretical background;
    • practical field work during the afternoon to train restoration-related research skills;
    • short presentations of research projects by the participants.

    For more information, see http://www.ser.org/events.asp?EventID=180.


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